Category: Omnibus Studies

Omnibus

The description of Omnibus class.

Meaning “by all” (Latin), is the word that we use to describe our combined Literature, History, and Theology class.  These studies help us to learn of the past – the Good, the True, and the Beautiful.   We find ourselves in history and in the purposes of God in order to better pursue rhetorical invention and understand our circumstance.

The class session (typically a semester) centers on Reading Lists and schedules, designed to balance a broad and representative selection of literature around periods of thought and time – the ancient, medieval, and modern organizing principle.

 

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Patriarchs

Abram to Joseph – the time of the Patriarchs.

From the time of Abram’s exit from the city of Ur, probably during the Gutean chaos of the late 3rd millennium BC, until the entry into Egypt in the time of Joseph marks the era of the Patriarchs.   We find this story recorded in Genesis chapters 12 through 50.

Find a timeline of the Patriarchs here.

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Plato

The study of Plato leads us to a contemplation of the forms. The Republic contemplates the possibility of virtue as well as politics and the afterlife. Gorgias makes us aware of rhetoric. Protagoras shows us a sophist and his politics, while the Symposium celebrates Love, the greatest of the Spiritual Virtues.

Student of Socrates and Philosopher of the Form, this idealist is famous for his dialogues.  Writing in the context of late classical Greece, his Republic is a monument of Western Literature, and a demonstration of the  form of good, the focus of idealism – later called realism in the middle ages.  His successor, Aristotle, revolutionized epistemology with his ontological thinking on a wide range of topics.

Socrates, the center of Plato’s writing, engages in the dialectic, or elenchus, a predecessor of the syllogistic mode of formal logic.

Timeline of Plato and the philosophers in Athens.

Reading Guides:

Book I

platoguide1repub

Book II

platoguiderepublic2

Book III

platorepublicguide3

Book IV

platoguiderepublic4

Book V

platorepublicguide5

Book VI

platorepublicguide6

Book VII

platorepublicguide7

Book VIII

platoreadingguide8

Book IX

readingguideplato9

Book X

Readingguideplato10

 

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Quintilian’s Reading List

Marcus Fabius Quintilianus publishes a great books list – 69-79 AD.

Greeks

  • Homer
  • Hesiod
  • Antimachus
  • Panyasis
  • Apollonius
  • Aratus
  • Theocritus
  • Pisandros
  • Nicander
  • Euphorion
  • Tyrtaeus
  • Elegiac Poets
    • Callimachus
    • Philetas
  • Iambics
    • Aristarchus
    • Archilochus
  • Lyric Poets
    • Pindar
    • Stesichorus
    • Alcaeus
    • Simonides
  • Old Comedy
    • Aristophanes
    • Eupolis
    • Cratinus
  • Tragedy
  • New Comedy
    • Menander
    • Philemon
  • History
  • Orators
    • Demosthenes
    • Aeschines
    • Hyperides
    • Lysias
    • Isocrates
  • Philosophers

Latins

  • Virgil
  • Macer
  • Lucretius
  • Varro
  • Ennius
  • Ovid
  • Cornelius Severus
  • Serranus
  • Rabirius
  • Pedo
  • Lucan
  • Elegaics
    • Tibullus
    • Popertius
    • Ovid
    • Gallus
  • Satire
    • Lucilius
    • Horace
    • Pesius
    • Terentius Varro
  • Iambics
    • Catullus
    • Bibaculus
    • Horace
  • Lyric
    • Horace
  • Tragedy
    • Accius
    • Pacuvius
    • Varius
    • Ovid
    • Pomponius Secundus
  • Comedy
    • Plautus
    • Terence
    • Afranius
  • History
    • Sallust
    • Titus Livius
    • Servilius
    • Aufidius Bassus
    • Cremutius
  • Orators
    • Cicero
    • Asinius Pollio
    • Messala
    • Caesar
    • Caelius
    • Calvus
    • Servius Sulpicius
    • Cassius Severus
  • Philosophers
    • Cicero
    • Brutus
    • Cornelius Celsus
    • Plautus
    • Catius
    • Seneca
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Reading Lists

The study of literature in the Omnibus classes are grouped typically in historical areas: Ancient Medieval Modern Historical Reading List Veritas Press Reading List Adler Great Books List Classical School…

The study of literature in the Omnibus classes are grouped typically in historical areas:

  1. Ancient
  2. Medieval
  3. Modern

Historical Reading List

Veritas Press Reading List

Adler Great Books List

Classical School of Wichita Reading Lists

Quintilian’s Reading List

Harvard Classics

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Research Plan I

Research Plan I – Friday Week 6 The research plan will eventually evolve into the arguments and grammatical material (logic and grammar) of the Thesis. Beginning with an invention sheet…

Research Plan I – Friday Week 6

The research plan will eventually evolve into the arguments and grammatical material (logic and grammar) of the Thesis. Beginning with an invention sheet based on the Working Hypothesis, the student conducts an ‘A.N.I’ (affirmative, negative, interesting) assessment based on the Five Common Topics. These results, mostly questions, will indicate the direction of research.

The Five Common Topics are:

Definition
Comparison
Circumstance
Relation
Authority

Arrange your questions by these categories, approaching each as a positive, a negative, and an ‘interesting’ aspect of the question.

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Rome

Rome The history of ancient Rome may be divided into the Kingdom, the Republic, and the Empire. Roman government during the monarchy: Roman Government of the Republic: Interactive history from…

Rome

Picture of Rome

The Ancient City of Rome

The history of ancient Rome may be divided into the Kingdom, the Republic, and the Empire.

Roman government during the monarchy:

Penguin Atlas of World History Roman Monarchy

Roman Government of the Republic:

Penguin Atlas of World History Roman Republic

Interactive history from ‘Maps as History’

The Romans separate themselves from their Etruscan kings, with the expulsion of Tarquinius Superbus, establishing the early Early Republic Timeline.

Of particular importance is the historic struggle of Rome to maintain its Republican ideal in the face of the pressures of a global empire.

Punic War

The Mediterranean at the time of the 2nd Punic War

The Roman Republic, in gaining control of Italy, finds itself facing Magna Graeca, followed by Carthage.  These wars bring Rome into contact with the entities to the east.  See The Conquest of the Mediterranean, a timeline covering the events leading to social upheaval in Rome.

The Fall of the Republic , a timeline covering the events between the slave wars and the assassination of Julius Caesar.

Examine a presentation concerning the ‘Social War’

social wars

Reading Guides for the Penguin edition of ‘Cicero: Selected Works’

Part I of the Second Philippic against Antony Cicero Reading Guide

 

 

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Sparta

A Greek city state, the largest in the classical Greek world, characterized by oligarchy (timocracy) and a purposeful conservatism. Documentary: ┬áThe Rise and Fall of Sparta Government structure:  

A Greek city state, the largest in the classical Greek world, characterized by oligarchy (timocracy) and a purposeful conservatism.

Documentary:  The Rise and Fall of Sparta

Government structure:

spartagovt

 

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The Aeneid

Aneas, fleeing the downfall of Troy, makes his way to ‘Hesperia’ where his conquests will lead to foundation of Rome, and the initiation of the Julii. Like Odysseus, his destination…

Aneas, fleeing the downfall of Troy, makes his way to ‘Hesperia’ where his conquests will lead to foundation of Rome, and the initiation of the Julii. Like Odysseus, his destination comes only after multiple adventures, including a doomed sojourn in the city of Carthage or ‘Byrsa’ with the first ruler of that city – Queen Dido. Compare the voyage of Aeneas with the voyage of Odysseus in The Odyssey.

aeneas.PNG

 

Book I – Juno tries to obliterate the fleeing Trojans

Arma virumque cano, Troiae qui primus ab oris
Italiam, fato profugus, Laviniaque venit
litora, multum ille et terris iactatus et alto
vi superum saevae memorem Iunonis ob iram;
multa quoque et bello passus, dum conderet urbem, 5
inferretque deos Latio, genus unde Latinum,
Albanique patres, atque altae moenia Romae.
1. Juno – Aeolus- Neptune: The Storm

Juno asks Aeolus for a favor!

‘Aeole, namque tibi divom pater atque hominum rex 65
et mulcere dedit fluctus et tollere vento,
gens inimica mihi Tyrrhenum navigat aequor,
Ilium in Italiam portans victosque Penates:
incute vim ventis submersasque obrue puppes,
aut age diversos et disiice corpora ponto. 70
Sunt mihi bis septem praestanti corpore nymphae,
quarum quae forma pulcherrima Deiopea,
conubio iungam stabili propriamque dicabo,
omnis ut tecum meritis pro talibus annos
exigat, et pulchra faciat te prole parentem.’ 75

Aeolus in reply…

Aeolus haec contra: ‘Tuus, O regina, quid optes
explorare labor; mihi iussa capessere fas est.
2. Aeneas meets his mother – Venus (in disguise- she disguises him)

3. The temple of Juno – the Bronze Depiction of the battle of Troy
a. Ekphrasis — the review of the Trojan scene

Aneas gazes on the bronze reproduction of the Trojan War….

Constitit, et lacrimans, ‘Quis iam locus’ inquit ‘Achate,
quae regio in terris nostri non plena laboris? 460
En Priamus! Sunt hic etiam sua praemia laudi;
sunt lacrimae rerum et mentem mortalia tangunt.
Solve metus; feret haec aliquam tibi fama salutem.’

b. The present tense verbs

4. Aeneas and Achates are revealed to Dido

5. Venus enlists Cupid to protect Aeneas (with powerful consequences!)
Book II – The Iliad Part 2

1. The Trojan Horse

2. A Greek bearing gifts – a tale – Sinon

3. Laocoon and the Serpents

4. Priam’s last stand

5. Anchises, Creusa and Ascanius
a. Ascanius (Iulus)’s head catches fire (see Livy)
b. Aeneas carries Anchises away on his back
c. Creusa is a ghost!

ausus quin etiam voces iactare per umbram
implevi clamore vias, maestusque Creusam
nequiquam ingeminans iterumque iterumque vocavi. 770
quaerenti et tectis urbis sine fine ruenti
infelix simulacrum atque ipsius umbra Creusae
visa mihi ante oculos et nota maior imago.
obstipui, steteruntque comae et uox faucibus haesit.
tum sic adfari et curas his demere dictis: 775
‘quid tantum insano iuvat indulgere dolori,
o dulcis coniunx? non haec sine numine divum
eveniunt; nec te comitem hinc portare Creusam
fas, aut ille sinit superi regnator Olympi.
longa tibi exsilia et vastum maris aequor arandum, 780
et terram Hesperiam venies, ubi Lydius arva
inter opima virum leni fluit agmine Thybris.
illic res laetae regnumque et regia coniunx
parta tibi; lacrimas dilectae pelle Creusae.
non ego Myrmidonum sedes Dolopumue superbas 785
aspiciam aut Grais servitum matribus ibo,
Dardanis et divae Veneris nurus;
sed me magna deum genetrix his detinet oris.
iamque vale et nati serva communis amorem.’
haec ubi dicta dedit, lacrimantem et multa volentem 790
dicere deseruit, tenuisque recessit in auras.
ter conatus ibi collo dare bracchia circum;
ter frustra comprensa manus effugit imago,
par levibus ventis volucrique simillima somno.
sic demum socios consumpta nocte reviso. 795

Book III – The Odyssey Part 2

1. Sailing to Thrace

2. On to Delos

3. To Crete
Aeneas learns of Hesperia.

4. Strophades – harpies!

Celaeno the Harpy prophesies: “Permitted to enter port but never granted a iity girded round by ramparts, not before some terrible hunger and your attack on us- outrageous slaughter- drive you to gnaw your platters with your teeth!” (Fagles, Book III — line 309)

5. Actium – site of future importance

6. Phaeacia
Andromache survives.

7. The Coast of the Cyclops

8. Drepanum and the death of Anchises
Book IV – Dido dies of love – Aeneas follows his destiny
Lovesick on the coming departure of Aeneas…

Et iam prima novo spargebat lumine terras
Tithoni croceum linquens Aurora cubile. 585
regina e speculis ut primam albescere lucem
vidit et aequatis classem procedere velis,
litoraque et vacuos sensit sine remige portus,
terque quaterque manu pectus percussa decorum
flaventisque abscissa comas ‘pro Iuppiter! ibit 590
hic,’ ait ‘et nostris inluserit advena regnis?
non arma expedient totaque ex urbe sequentur,
diripientque rates alii navalibus? ite,
ferte citi flammas, date tela, impellite remos!
quid loquor? aut ubi sum? quae mentem insania mutat? 595
infelix Dido, nunc te facta impia tangent?

Dido and Aeneas Score

 

Book VI – Aeneas procures the ‘Golden Bough’ and travels to the underworld
The land of the dead lies past the Sybil at Cumae, in a deep cave with subterranean waters.

 

Cave at Cumae

The Sybil’s cave – Aeneas in the underworld. Map from the Barrington Classical Atlas

Book VI (cont.)

1. The Temple of Apollo at Cumae

2. The Sybil –
“poscere fata tempus” ait: “deus, ecce, deus!”
She undergoes a ‘possession’

3. Prophecy –Turnus — the new Achilles

4. The Golden Bough

5. Misenus – the funeral

6. Avernus —- the Birdless Place!
– the mother of the Eumenides – Night (daugher of Chaos)
-Stygian King – Pluto
-the empty halls of Dis

7. Acheron
-Charon the boatman
-Palinarus (the unburied!)

8. Cerberus

9. The Mourning Fields
Dido
Sychaeus

10. The Far Fields –Neither Elysium or Tartarus
Warriors
-who is Deiphobus

The glorious future of Rome (actually history!) according to Father Anchises:
excudent alii spirantia mollius aera
(credo equidem), vivos ducent de marmore vultus,
orabunt causas melius, caelique meatus
describent radio et surgentia sidera dicent: 850
tu regere imperio populos, Romane, memento
(hae tibi erunt artes), pacique imponere morem,
parcere subiectis et debellare superbos.’

The Gates of Sleep – one of horn, the other of ivory.

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