Category: Rhetoric and Composition

Hosea

Hosea:  “The Lord Saves” Hosea cannot bear to speak of judgement without speaking of redemption.   For this reason, we think of Hosea as the prophet with the biggest heart….

Hosea:  “The Lord Saves”

Hosea cannot bear to speak of judgement without speaking of redemption.   For this reason, we think of Hosea as the prophet with the biggest heart.

Continuing a theme detected in Amos, Hosea expounds on the ripening evil of the Kingdom of Israel, and is commanded to take a harlot as his wife, to illustrate with his life amidst his countrymen the pain of estrangement that exists between God and his people.

We encounter the three children:  Scattered, Unpitied, and Stranger.

In Chapters 1 and 2 we see fine examples of Chiasm, Chapter 3 clarifies and specifies the situation in Hosea’s immediate future.

The Chapters 4 through 10 are meditations on the events of Hosea’s day.

 

The Circumstance of Hosea’s prophecies

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Narratio

This is the body of topicality for a persuasive essay or speech.  Following the exordium, it tells us enough, but not too much, of the fundamental issues of the matter…

This is the body of topicality for a persuasive essay or speech.  Following the exordium, it tells us enough, but not too much, of the fundamental issues of the matter at hand.

Sometimes the Narratio is translated as “The Statement of Facts”.

Aristotle on Rhetoric discusses the Narration in Book III, chapter 16.

Stasis is an excellent tool for the invention of the narratio.

Quintilian’s Institutio Oratia, in Book III Chapter 4 begins a discussion on Indefinite questions as leading to the definite.   We may consider this as the development of a Thesis that encompasses an Hypothesis.

Following discussions of Status would appear to develop the Narratio in the following way:

  1. The case that something is so. A proposition must be made, usually in the affirmative that a thing exists.
  2. This thing must be somehow defined, either by a recourse to the 4 causes, a narrative structure, an example. etc.
  3. That this thing is somehow good or bad. In most deliberative/ and therefore hypothetical rhetoric, this gives us the basis for the final stage. Here we have a last chance to demonstrate a theoretical conclusion as we prepare to move into the special nature of our work. Another way of thinking about this is that we have settled the ‘General’ question here, before we move on to the ‘Specific’. The hear of our Thesis resides here. This ends the ‘Theoretical’ part of our narratio. (We may reply to this later in our Amplification).
  4. We move here into the specific, or hypothetic realm of our presentation. It has two parts concerning action:
    1. What is possible to do (or think).
    2. What we will do (or think).

 

Additional work on the Narratio includes decisions on brevity and necessary length for thoroughness.  Refer to Quintilian in Book IV.

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Proof I

Sample Proof I – Friday Week 8 A prospective particular supporting the main proposition as it exists at the moment, this supporting argument will be understood as an inductive proof…

Sample Proof I – Friday Week 8

A prospective particular supporting the main proposition as it exists at the moment, this supporting argument will be understood as an inductive proof or a deductive demonstration.   It should draw on some of the stated research plan, and elevate interest in the Hypothesis.  Reference to the research needed should be included in initial notes, here compiled as ‘end notes’ in the Chicago format.

Construct this proof using the rules of Stasis.

In Week 12 you will produce and hand in a Research Paper covering this proof.

 

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Research Plan I

Research Plan I – Friday Week 6 The research plan will eventually evolve into the arguments and grammatical material (logic and grammar) of the Thesis. Beginning with an invention sheet…

Research Plan I – Friday Week 6

The research plan will eventually evolve into the arguments and grammatical material (logic and grammar) of the Thesis. Beginning with an invention sheet based on the Working Hypothesis, the student conducts an ‘A.N.I’ (affirmative, negative, interesting) assessment based on the Five Common Topics. These results, mostly questions, will indicate the direction of research.

The Five Common Topics are:

Definition
Comparison
Circumstance
Relation
Authority

Arrange your questions by these categories, approaching each as a positive, a negative, and an ‘interesting’ aspect of the question.

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Rhetoric

Marcus Fabius Quintilian (35 A.D. – 98? A.D.) defines rhetoric as “a good man speaking well” .   The concerns of Rhetoric may be grouped into Aristotle’s three modes of…

Marcus Fabius Quintilian (35 A.D. – 98? A.D.) defines rhetoric as “a good man speaking well” .   The concerns of Rhetoric may be grouped into Aristotle’s three modes of invention:  Forensic, Epidiectic, and Political.

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The Presentation: Its Schedule

Trial Exordium Trial Narratio Proof Presentation (Research Paper) Narratio with Propositio Stasis Proof II Presentation (Research Paper) Complete Arrangement Proof III Presentation (Research Paper) Memory Sed Contra Chrysostom

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